Then, That Boy Named Hannibal Lecter Grew Up

When someone is really good at something like playing a sport or instrument they are amazing to watch. Even if you yourself are not in to that particular thing, usually an exceptional talent has the ability to draw you in.

If their skill or talent is up your alley, then at the very least it’s easy to become mesmerized.

And what about when you want to learn about something you aren’t familiar with? Then, you seek out the professional, or someone who is pretty good at the skill set you are interested in, right?

That’s what I would do.

And that very idea leads in to the second book concerning this week’s theme of:

Monday’s book, Hannibal Rising, is about Hannibal’s childhood and although it was written fourth, I feel it should be read first.

Red Dragon by Thomas Harris was written first, but it should be read second. This book is about a serial killer who brutally murders families in their homes. When the police continue to struggle with this case, retired FBI agent, Will Graham who has a special talent for catching serial killers comes out of retirement to help. Graham was almost killed in the process of catching his last serial killer, Dr. Hannibal Lecter. Although Graham and Lecter have a violent history that put Lecter in prison, Graham reaches out to him for help with this current case.

So, just because someone is good at something doesn’t automatically mean that something is a good thing. But it also doesn’t mean you can not learn from them.

Red Dragon is the first book to explore Lecter not only as an adult, but also as an important, highly intelligent resource. What makes Lecter so dangerous is that he knows how intelligent he is. Due to this, his manipulations and charismatic characteristics flow almost seamlessly in to every conversation and situation almost effortlessly.

Well bookworms, we are now halfway through the Hannibal Lecter quartet. Stick around for the rest of the week, each book only gets better!

“The very air had screams smeared on it. He flinched from the noise in this silent room.” -Thomas Harris, Red Dragon

“Don’t think you can persuade me with appeals to my intellectual vanity.” -Thomas Harris, Red Dragon

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