One Bad Apple

I guess it could start as a bruise. Maybe it was caused by a fall? Then it sits for awhile and you forget about it, if you even noticed it in the first place.

Maybe a bug got to it and made a little hole and then the hole got bigger.

Or maybe it was bad from the very beginning? Maybe the seed wasn’t quite right.

Whatever the reason of how it came to be this way doesn’t really matter. Really you don’t even realize anything is amiss because your mind is thinking of ten different things.

What matters is this:

When you go to take a bite, your teeth hit mush. Your whole mouth instantly revolts against the disgusting texture. The ten different things you were thinking of have disappeared from your mind. In fact, all you can think about is getting every last bit of the mush out of your mouth.

All because of one bad apple 🍎.

Maybe if you hadn’t been so busy you might’ve noticed that something looked off, that the apple didn’t look so good from the start.

But what about that apple that looks completely perfect? Maybe even the first few bites are fine. Then, even though it was there the whole time, you take a fourth bite and you realize it’s rotten to the core.

Sometimes people are like that too-rotten to the core.

Continuing with this week’s true crime is My Friend Anna – The True Story of a Fake Heiress by Rachel DeLouche Williams.

This book was featured on a recent non-fiction list of new books to watch out for. When I first read what it was about I instantly thought of two books both featuring ingenious con-artists. The Talented Mr. Ripley by Patricia Highsmith and Catch Me If You Can by Frank Abagnale and Stan Redding.

Below is the Amazon synopsis:

Vanity Fair photo editor Rachel DeLoache Williams’s new friend Anna Delvey, a self-proclaimed German heiress, was worldly and ambitious. She was also generous—picking up the tab for lavish dinners at Le Coucou, infrared sauna sessions at HigherDOSE, drinks at the 11 Howard Library bar, and regular workout sessions with a celebrity personal trainer.

When Anna proposed an all-expenses-paid trip to Marrakech at the five-star La Mamounia hotel, Rachel jumped at the chance. But when Anna’s credit cards mysteriously stopped working, the dream vacation quickly took a dark turn. Anna asked Rachel to begin fronting costs—first for flights, then meals and shopping, and, finally, for their $7,500-per-night private villa. Before Rachel knew it, more than $62,000 had been charged to her credit cards. Anna swore she would reimburse Rachel the moment they returned to New York.

Back in Manhattan, the repayment never materialized, and a shocking pattern of deception emerged. Rachel learned that Anna had left a trail of deceit—and unpaid bills—wherever she’d been. Mortified, Rachel contacted the district attorney, and in a stunning turn of events, found herself helping to bring down one of the city’s most notorious con artists •

Horrible, but fascinating.

How does such a person so completely and quickly immerse themselves within the lives of others, without their motives being questioned?

It’s kind of like the apple. Maybe we see the apple out of the corner of our eye and grab it. Maybe it’s not even bit in to right away, but tossed in our bag for later. So it travels with us. Until that moment when we are ready for a break, for that apple we grabbed hours ago.

But it isn’t what it seemed. The snack is ruined. Granted, a con-artist is different and much worse than a rotten apple. However, both leave you with a horrible taste in your mouth that won’t quickly be forgotten.

So, pay attention. People and things are not always what they seem.

Did you happen to notice which apple was fake in the picture above? I’ve circled the bad apple below👇

“You can’t read all day (if you don’t start in the morning).” – Anonymous

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