The Anatomy of How Reading Too Many Books At One Time Happens

Today is the 26th of June. I finished my sixth book of the month three days ago and was happy with that total. But the idea that seven days were left (three days ago) in the month spurred my thinking, Ok, surely with a full week you can get in one more book. Not a crazy thought at all. What is crazy is this: in a matter of those three measly days I am now in the middle of reading five simultaneously. What the what? I always do this to myself. It’s like I secretly want to sabotage my month reading goals. As I sat here being annoyed with myself (PS. I don’t mind reading two or even three books at the same time-but five? That sh@# needs to stop) I thought a post on the anatomy of how someone comes to be reading five books happens. As if any rationale can truly be possible, but I’ll try.

It started with:

1. The Night Train to Lisbon, which I wrote about a few days ago. This is a longer, somewhat philosophical novel written so eloquently that I enjoy reading it slower. The very essence of having the *perfect reading conditions were created for books like this one.

*very quiet, possibly sitting by a window with beautiful light, while under a blanket and holding a drink (preferably coffee or wine). In extreme perfect conditions a very low volume of wordless music. Disclaimer: this rarely happens, so I may be buried with this one. Just kidding, I’ll finish it, but I’ll have moved to the large print version.

Next,

2. I Know Who You Are by Alice Feeney. This was an Overdrive book that came in. This is Feeney’s second book. I had fully planned on reading her first, Sometimes I Lie, which is on my nightstand, but then this one arrived. Library books have to have some kind of preference due to their time restraints (as I’ve talked of in past posts). So far so good, the story seems catchy even if the writing is a little sophomoric. But hey, she’s published I’m not, so there’s that.

Moving on,

3. Call The Nurse, True Stories of a Country Nurse on a Scottish Isle by Mary J. MacLeod. This was recommended by a bookclub friend a week or so ago, Overdrive had it so I placed it on hold. Would you believe it also arrived for my Kindle two days ago-a twist you never saw coming (that one’s for you, J)? Anyway two nights ago after reading a bit of the Feeney book I thought I’d read a page or two just to see if it was interesting. Well four percent into it later, I realized I liked it. Ugh! And it’s a freaking library book, so the feeling that I must read it now persists.

Have I totally annoyed you? Well if you are still reading, I’ll keep writing,

4. Self-Portrait With Boy by Rachel Lyons. This is an actual physical copy of a library book, which somehow also has that time constraint, but doesn’t feel the same as an e-copy (absolutely no logic, I know). This was part of a stack I picked up almost two weeks ago. This stack consisted of books that have not as of yet been available on Overdrive. I have wanted to read this one for awhile. I flipped it open yesterday just to see and fifty pages happened. Double ugh.

Last and certainly not least,

5. The Woman in the Window by A. J. Finn. Another book I received from Overdrive this-freaking-morning, the kicker is: I have been on hold for this book twice and this second hold has been for at least six months. So if that isn’t guilt enough to get this book read I don’t know what is.

Does my explanation offer any insight in the chaos that is me? It happens organically, I never intend for this to happen. I just love books too much and I want to read them all at the same dang time.

“Never put off till tomorrow the book you can read today.”

– Holbrook Jackson

2 thoughts on “The Anatomy of How Reading Too Many Books At One Time Happens

  1. 1. Love the comment about large print version!
    2. Don’t even think about spoiling those unexpected twists!
    3. I think I get a little too excited when you post. I LOVE IT! Keep em’ coming.
    4. Quit reading my comment and get back to book number 426!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s